Research Projects

IAA - Local Industrial Strategies Impact Acceleration

ACTIVE

 

Funding: ESRC (through the Leeds Social Science Institute Impact Acceleration Account and CCCEP)
Project Lead: Dr Jonathan Busch
Website: CCCEP.ac.uk
Dates: May 2018 - November 2019

Project Summary

This project funded a knowledge exchange workshop between the Leeds City Region and Styria in Austria, including participants from local government, industry and academia, and a subsequent secondment to the West Yorkshire Combined Authority to contribute to writing the Local Industrial Strategy for the region.

Outputs: 

CCCEP - A Low Carbon Industrial Strategy for the UK

ACTIVE

 

Funding: ESRC
Project Leads: Prof. Tim Foxon, Dr. Julia Steinberger, Prof. Peter Taylor
Website: CCCEP.ac.uk
Dates: March 2016 - November 2017

Project Summary

This project aims to develop a quantitative framework to test policy interventions for systemic low carbon transitions where the co-benefits and roles of government, market and civil-society actors are emphasised.

Outputs: 
  • Busch J, Foxon TJ, Taylor PG (April 2017) Designing Industrial Strategies for a Low Carbon Transformation, Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions. 29, pp. 114-125. doi:j.eist.2018.07.005

  • Millward-Hopkins J, Busch J (October 2017) Your Money or Your Morals, Open Democracy.

  • Busch J, Foxon TJ, Taylor PG (April 2017) Designing Industrial Strategies for a Low Carbon Transformation, Sustainability Research Institute Working Paper No. 109 and Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Working Paper No. 304. doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.14170.34240

  • Busch J; Dawson D; Roelich K (2017) Closing the low-carbon material loop using a dynamic whole system approach, Journal of Cleaner Production 149, pp.751-761.
    doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.02.166 (Open Access)

  • T.J. Foxon, P. Taylor, J. Busch (September 2016) Written evidence submission to the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee's Industrial Strategy Inquiry [PDF]

  • Busch J (July 2016), How to build a Low Carbon Industrial Strategy, The Conversation.

Presentations:

CVORR (Complex Value Optimisation for Resource Recovery)

ACTIVE

 

Funding: NERC/ESRC
Project Lead: Prof. Phil Purnell
Website: SuRe-Infrastructure.leeds.ac.uk/CVORR
Dates: October 2014 - March 2016

Project Summary

The CVORR project is developing a value assessment framework for product/waste systems based on a concept of complex value that encompasses economic, social, environmental and technical dimensions. My work on this project was the development of the framework and particularly the creation of modelling tools that enable the accounting of complex value across a whole system.

Outputs:
  • Iacovidou E; Millward-Hopkins J; Busch J; Purnell P; Velis CA; Hahladakis JN (2017) “A pathway to circular economy: Developing a conceptual framework for complex value assessment of resources recovered from waste”, Journal of Cleaner Production (in press). doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.09.002

  • Millward-Hopkins J; Busch J; Brown A; Hahladakis JN; Purnell P; Velis CA; Zwirner O; Iacovidou E (2017) “Modelling Complex Value in Contexts of Resource Recovery from Waste”, Science of the Total Environment 612, pp.613-624. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.211

  • Iacovidou E; Busch J; Hahladakis J; Baxter H; Ng KS; Herbert BMJ (2017) A Parameter Selection Framework for Sustainability Assessment, Sustainability 9, 1497. doi:10.3390/su9091497

  • Iacovidou E; Purnell P; Velis C; Hahladakis J; Busch J (2016) The use of metrics in guiding transformation in resource recovery systems, 4th International Conference on Sustainable Solid Waste Management, Cyprus.

  • Coronado M; Iacovidou E; Busch J; Velis C; Purnell P (2015) Complex Value Optimisation for Resource Recovery (CVORR): A Tool for an Evidence-based Pathway to Circular Economy, WASCON 2015 – resource efficiency in construction- 9th International Conference on the environmental and technical implications of Construction with Alternative Materials, Santander, Spain.

MAPeRR (Multi-parametric Assessment of Policies for Resource Recovery from Waste)

COMPLETE

Funding: NERC/ESRC

Project Leads: Helen Baxter, Jonathan Busch, John Hahladakis, Ben Herbert, Eleni Iacovidou, Kok Siew Ng

Dates: July 2016 - February 2017

Project Summary

The MAPeRR project is a mini-project funded under the NERC/ESRC Research Recovery from Waste Programme. MAPeRR aims to develop a methodology that enables sustainability assessments to guide policy making by accounting for the socio-political context within which resource recovery systems operate.

Outputs:
  • Iacovidou E; Busch J; Hahladakis J; Baxter H; Ng KS; Herbert BMJ (2017) A Parameter Selection Framework for Sustainability Assessment, Sustainability 9, 1497. doi:10.3390/su9091497

iBuild (Infrastructure Business Models, valuation and innovation for local delivery)

COMPLETE

Funding: EPSRC/ESRC
Project Lead: Dr. Katy Roelich
Website: iBuild.ac.uk
Dates: November 2013 - May 2015

Project Summary

The iBuild centre studies the delivery of infrastructure at local scales based on developing new understanding of the economics and valuation of infrastructure. My work on this project was on a work package on the scaling of local infrastructure business models where the role of alternative local actors is crucial. We used a participatory modelling approach based on 'Decision Theatre' workshops to develop an agent based model of district heating development in UK cities to study how policy interventions can best support the process. 

Outputs:
  • Busch J; Dawson D; Roelich K (2017) Closing the low-carbon material loop using a dynamic whole system approach, Journal of Cleaner Production 149, pp.751-761.
    doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.02.166 (Open Access)

  • Busch J; Roelich K; Bale CSE; Knoeri C (2017) Scaling up local energy infrastructure; An agent-based model of the emergence of district heating networks, Energy Policy, 100, pp.170-180. doi: 10.1016/j.enpol.2016.10.011 (Open Access)

  • Foxon TJ; Bale CSE; Busch J; Bush R; Hall S; Roelich K (2015) Low carbon infrastructure investment: extending business models for sustainability, Infrastructure Complexity, 2. doi: 10.1186/s40551-015-0009-4 (Open Access)

  • Busch, J; Bale CSE; Knoeri C; Roelich K; (2014) Emergence of District-Heating Networks; Barriers and Enablers in the Development Process, International Symposium for Next Generation Infrastructure (ISNGI 2014), Vienna.

  • iBUILD (2015), Are you being served? Alternative infrastructure business models to improve economic growth and well-being, iBUILD manifesto and mid-term report. Newcastle University. ISBN 978-09928437-1-7. PDF

  • Busch J, Dawson DA, Purnell P, Roelich K, Steinberger JK (2014) “Accounting for critical materials in sustainable energy provision: maintaining systemic resilience”, In: Brown A; Robertson M (Eds); “Economic evaluation of systems of infrastructure provision: concepts, approaches, methods”, Leeds University. PDF

Undermining Infrastructure

COMPLETE

Funding: EPSRC
Project Leads: Prof. Phil Purnell, Dr. Julia Steinberger, Dr. Katy Roelich
Website: SuRe-Infrastructure.leeds.ac.uk/UI
Dates: November 2011 - April 2014

Project Summary

The infrastructure systems that support our economy and daily lives are in urgent need of repair and reconstruction. Under the threat of climate change, a transition to infrastructure with substantially lower carbon emissions is also required. Although the technical solutions to address these challenges exist, implementing them will require an unprecedented program of infrastructure renewal. The scale of such a program will require substantial physical resources. The low-carbon technologies that will need to be rolled out at infrastructure-scale contain materials that have previously been used in only relatively small industrial applications. The step-change in demand for these materials will place significant pressure on their supply chains, creating a serious risk of supply disruption. 

In this project, we addressed three interlocking problems:

  • What materials, in what quantities and when are required for planned low-carbon infrastructure transitions?

  • How do we assess the vulnerability of a planned transition to potential material supply disruptions? 

  • How do we make better decisions in planning transitions and choosing technologies to reduce the risk of material supply disruption?

The solutions we developed where demonstrated on infrastructure systems including low-carbon electricity generation and electric personal transportation. Both of these contain materials that have been identified as potentially critical: lithium and rare-earth elements.

Outputs:
  • Dawson DA; Purnell P; Roelich K; Busch J; Steinberger JK (2014) Low carbon technology performance vs infrastructure vulnerability: Analysis through the local and global properties space, Environmental Science and Technology, 48, pp.12970-12977. doi: 10.1021/es500902b OpenAccess

  • Roelich K; Dawson DA; Purnell P; Knoeri C; Revell R; Busch J; Steinberger JK (2014) Assessing the dynamic material criticality of infrastructure transitions: A case of low carbon electricity, Applied Energy, 123, pp. 378-386. doi: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2014.01.052 OpenAccess

  • Busch J; Steinberger JK; Dawson DA; Purnell P; Roelich K (2014) Managing Critical Materials with a Technology-Specific Stocks and Flows Model, Environmental Science and Technology, 48, pp.1298-1305. doi: 10.1021/es404877u OpenAccess

  • Purnell P; Dawson D; Roelich KE; Steinberger JK; Busch J (2013) Critical materials for infrastructure: local vs global properties, Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Engineering Sustainability, 166, pp.272-280. doi: 10.1680/ensu.12.00031 Subscription RequiredPDF

  • Roelich, K.E.; Busch, J.; Dawson, D.; Purnell, P.; and Steinberger, J.K. (2013) Assessing the critical material constraints on low carbon infrastructure transitions. Presented at the European Society of Ecological Economics. June 2013. PDF

  • Dawson, D.; Purnell, P.; Busch, J.; Roelich, K.E.; Steinberger, J.K.; and Revell, R. (2012) Towards Sustainable and Resilient (SuRe) Infrastructure: material dependency and the analysis of local vs global properties, 1st International Conference on Urban Sustainability and Resilience. PDF

  • Busch, J.; Dawson, D.; Roelich, K.E.; Revell, R.; Purnell, P.; and Steinberger, J.K. (2012) Material Risks to Sustainable Urban Infrastructure Transitions, 1st International Conference on Urban Sustainability and Resilience. PDF

  • Purnell, P.; Dawson, D.; Roelich, K.E.; Steinberger, J.K.; and Busch, J. (2012) Critical materials for low-carbon infrastructure: the analysis of local vs global properties, Earth Systems Engineering. PDF

  • Busch, J.; Dawson, D.; Roelich, K.; Steinberger, J.K.; and Purnell, P. (2012) Enhancing Stocks and Flows modelling to support sustainable resource management in low carbon infrastructure transitions, 2012 International Congress on Environmental Modelling and Software: Managing Resources of a Limited Planet, International Environmental Modelling and Software Society. PDF

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